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Wow. The the 444 can realy flip some ground. I bought a one bottom plow and cultivator a few weeks back.The guy who had it before me had it set deep. Buy the time I turned around the thing wad about 10" under ground. Took a few attempts to get the wheel cutting soil and the blade depth to about 4". Once it was set there was just no stopping it. The soil looked like a tilled garden when I was done. I still hooked up the cultivater and dragged that through to. The food plot has field rye and some lime on it now. The other legumes I planted didin't like the full sun or the chick weed just over powered it. Now all I need it a tow behind tank sprayer and I'll be all set.
 

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The general rule of thumb is for the plow to cut to a depth that equals one half of the plow size. In other words, a 12" plow would cut 6" deep, a 10" would cut 5" and a 8" would cut four. Of course, you can go plus or minus from those numbers if you wish.
 

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I have a 12" for my 444 and went to a plow day last year it rained we plowed anyway it was my first time plowing it pulled great did to gardens after that cant wait for fall plow days to start hopefully with better weather this year
 

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Measuring is not as clear-cut as it would seem to be. :sidelaugh:


The width designation has to do with how wide the plough actually cuts the furrow in the field. On some types of ploughs, it is possible to change the angle of the mouldboard so that it cuts less or more than the manufacturer's posted plough size. In other words, if someone owned a 14" plough, they could make it cut 12 or 16 inches by way of adjustment. Same plough blade but different results. Because the blade is on an angle, you cannot just measure the length of the blade bottom and come up with the plough width.

If you Google "measuring a turning plow", you will quickly become confused on this issue. I would be more inclined to go cut a single furrow and take a right-angle measurement of that in several places to see what the width was. Since there is 2 inches difference between the plough sizes, one would think that you should be able to determine which plough you have by using that method.

Does anyone else have a better method?
 
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