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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am going to have to get a new set of front tires for my '76-444 for pushing snow. I have seen where people have used Snow Hogs, but am wondering if anyone has used Carlisle X-Tracs on the front of their's. Looking for opinions here. Both are priced about the same with shipping to my home.
 

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I'll offer my opinion with no field tests to back it up. The treads on both of the tires in question are designed to provide traction on drive wheels and my guess is that they would not be as effective as the tri rib design on front tires that need good side to side traction to maintain steering control.
 

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I'm picking up a snow blade soon and due to its size was thinking about this same subject. I'll pretty much be pushing snow on concrete and asphalt. Seems like the turfs on the front of mine will be as good as any for that????
 

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My experience is that turf tires on the front and rear are the worst in snow because they quickly load up with snow. I find that the OEM ribbed style tires work better on the front but I believe that the tri ribs would be considerably better. The ag tires work very well on the rear unless you have ice in which case chains on the turfs will do as well as anything. Ag tires would probably be pretty good on the front but they should be reversed for best effect.
 

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My field tests revealed:
Turfs on front were dismal, the blade load did 85% of the steering
Reversed Ags with 5 psi were a big improvement
Adding chains to Ags was better yet, esp on ice, but it was difficult to properly fit the chains so that they would not slip and foul the spindle ears
This year I`m putting the chains on turfs and feel confident it will be great.
Have not tried the V-61`s or Tri-ribs but most users rave about them

JMO
 

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When I poured lead into a spare set of rims I was looking for a more aggressive tire. I was experiencing a great deal of front tire drifting when using the snowcaster. I looked at the Sno Hogs mailorder and seen they were all refered to as a snowblower tire. I sent an inquiry to Carlisle requesting more information and if the tire would be suited for use on my Ingersoll. There response is below:

Thank you for you're interest in Carlisle Tire and Wheel. These tires
would be in our Big Biter series. I would not consider them a wheel
barrow tire but they are used on snow blowers. I would not recommend
that you use either of these tires for your tractor. This is only a 2
ply tire with a Max PSI of 415 lbs. You may want to consider the Super
Lug 16 X 6.50 - 8 (p/n 5100961) that is a 4 ply with a 620 lbs Max PSI.
I know that the tread is different but unfortunately this is the only
tire in the Big Biter series that will replace the size that you have.
I have attached the link from our website and the dealer locator for you
to get pricing and availability.


http://www.carlisletire.com/products/bi ... index.html

http://www.carlisletire.com/locator/PrxInput.aspx

I bought a pair of Carlisle 4 ply from my local Ingersoll dealer (I could not get a better price online) for 35 each. Although these are a turf tire they are more aggressive then the ribbed tires I was currently using. I think my other problem was I had 32 psi instead of the recommended 14psi in the rib tire. These tires do not look bad and at 35 each seemed like a pretty good deal. I also was able to fit 2 gallons of windshield washer fluid in each tire.

 

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I purchased the same Carlisle ^ as Mark due to the round shoulders being more conducive to chain fitment. I regret that my local OPE dealer was $15 apiece higher than his Ingersoll dealer.
 

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99flhr said:
I purchased the same Carlisle ^ as Mark due to the round shoulders being more conducive to chain fitment. I regret that my local OPE dealer was $15 apiece higher than his Ingersoll dealer.
The price difference was probally because mine were older stock, they were very dusty and brown, They cleaned up great and are in perfect shape. They were a bear to get the bead to seal to the rim when first inflating them. I had to use a rachet strap wrapped around the center of the tire and crank it down forcing the walls of the tire to spread. I added air with the valve stem out and I still had to bounce the tire to get the bead to seal and inflate.
 

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I have ags on the front and maxis buckshot muddies (truck tires) on the back of my 444. When it was still in one piece I took it out in the corn field after a good rain and putted around in low range with a little spinning but I could not make the front wheels slide then I put it in high and let the mud fly and still could not make the ags spin. I also have a pair on v61s on a off topic tractor and they get excellent traction too.
 

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I've got one with the Tri-ribs and one with the Sno Hogs
(hogs can be seen on bottom of this page: http://www.data-cut.com/projects/Case448r4.html)

I have used both in Winter under Blower work, only the tri-ribs behind a blade. Frankly, EITHER is better than stock smoothys. The Tri-Ribs do dig in pretty good, especially if you lift the blade or blower a bit. The small contact patch puts a lot of weight down in a small area.

The snow hogs are soft tires.... I have fluid in them and hardly any air pressure. I think they do a little better on Ice because they have small contact areas, but many more of them almost like a siped tire. I will warn you that the hogs will require a lot more energy for turning at the steering wheel because they are soft, and the fingered tread tends to pull and twist when your trying to turn rather than SLIDE. While this is not serious when moving, you do notice it when standing still on hard stuff.

In the end, I think the hogs are the real ticket for overall steering traction. If you happened to have had one of the old Honda 3 wheelers and recall just how much crazy traction those low pressure rear knobbys had in ALL conditions, it kind of makes sense.

They dont look as nice as Tri's, but they do grip.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanx for info guys. Looking at the comments comparing tire types, and the pros and cons of each, along with the price by the time they are shipped to the door, I think I will be the guinea pig and try a set of the X-Tracs. $76.92 for a pair shipped to my door from Surplus Center. These come installed on snowblower wheels. I'll put my smoothies on those wheels for use on a cart. I certainly haven't found Tri-ribs for that price. People seemed to like ag's and Grummy had good comments about the Snow-Hogs. X-Tracs seem to be a combination of the two, so maybe they will work out ok. Time will tell.
 

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Billygoat said:
Thanx for info guys. Looking at the comments comparing tire types, and the pros and cons of each, along with the price by the time they are shipped to the door, I think I will be the guinea pig and try a set of the X-Tracs. $76.92 for a pair shipped to my door from Surplus Center. These come installed on snowblower wheels. I'll put my smoothies on those wheels for use on a cart. I certainly haven't found Tri-ribs for that price. People seemed to like ag's and Grummy had good comments about the Snow-Hogs. X-Tracs seem to be a combination of the two, so maybe they will work out ok. Time will tell.
Once you get them on and have given them a fair try under all types of weather conditions, you are expected to provide a full report as to how well they worked along with photos. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Have tires mounted and installed. I have done a little bit of testing, here's the results. No deck, no blade 8 psi, with blade 8 psi and 14 psi. So far I have found the ride to be smoother than I thought it would. I figured it would bounce against the tread but they ride very smooth. Turning as tight as it will from one direction to the other in bare dirt, low range, full throttle, it looks like I went thru on a four wheeler. In sparse grass, it was less noticeable. In nicer, thicker grass, there was nothing to really notice. I figure if one was to turn on the same path that eventually it would show signs of digging. I still wouldn't use them for mowing. The steering effort seemed to be easier than the smooth rib turfs I had on before. BTW- I have them on "backward" as I understand that's the way to run ag's on non driving wheels for better bite when steering.
 
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